Students working together on their laptops

 

Over the past decade, tensions in the U.S.-China relationship have increased, growing more antagonistic in areas from education and research to human rights, geopolitical developments, and trade and tariffs. The road ahead has numerous obstacles and U.S.-China relations face new and difficult challenges every day. While the development of an equitable, peaceful, and sustainable U.S.-China relationship remains crucial, a solution cannot be reached without sufficient mutual understanding and multi-facet bilateral cooperation. Young leaders in both countries need to work together to tackle the challenges we face. 

The University of Minnesota China Center is launching the China Bridge Challenge, a case competition that invites student teams to explore the intricate complexities encountered by the U.S. and China through a myriad of challenges, misunderstandings, and a rapidly deteriorating relationship, and find a way out through innovative collaborations. 

Each student team will identify a common challenge (within this year's theme of Building Sustainable Cities and Communities) that the U.S. and China face. Teams will compete through a proposal and video presentation, offering concrete plans for the next steps the U.S. and China can take to address the issue and find a solution that balances the interest and objectives of both China and the U.S.

The winning team will receive $6,000, and the runner-up will receive $4,000.

Learn more about competing.

Ready to apply?

Sign up as a team   Sign up as an individual

 

The China Center is pleased to partner with the College of Design for the 2021 competition. The College of Design provides a unique commitment to creativity and advancing technologies to innovate and educate in a full range of design fields. It provides leadership in the research of ongoing and emerging issues, exploring new knowledge, and addressing and solving real-world problems—all while adhering to socially responsible, sustainable principles and collaborative design thinking.